Basement Excavating: How Much Can You Expect to Pay for Basement Excavation?

Excavating your basement can be a great way to increase the living space in your house. The cost of excavating your basement is determined by the depth, complexity, and location of the basement excavation, as well as other factors such as whether or not you need to move pipes or drains. When it comes time to start thinking about how much your project will cost, what is the purpose of excavation? Let’s have a look at some essential things that you need to consider:

What Are the Cost Factors?

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Material

Excavating a basement can be a messy process. Material such as dirt, rocks, and debris will need to remove from the job site. There are several ways to remove this material from your home – by truck or on foot using wheelbarrows or small dump carts. The method of removing material that you choose may add some cost to the project’s total price.

The more complicated shape of your excavation area is, the more expensive it will likely be because more time will have been spent on it. For example, excavating a simple square-shaped room in the corner of your basement would likely cost less than excavating an amoeba-shaped room at one end of a long narrow hallway.

Hourly Rates

Excavating contractors usually work on an hourly basis. The more skilled the contractor, the higher their rate will likely be. If you hire a contractor with a high hourly rate, you may expect them to be able to complete your project quickly and correctly. Hourly rates can vary greatly, so it is important that you do some research before hiring one of these professionals.

Additional Costs

Some additional costs that may need to be considered are taxes, dump fees, and transportation charges if the material needs to be hauled away by a truck. Excavation projects often remove more dirt than initially expected, so it is best to plan this additional cost during your budgeting process.

Location

The location of your excavation project will contribute to the total cost. Projects located in areas with lots of trees or rocky ground can be difficult and expensive to excavate because these types of surfaces do not give way easily. Other factors such as proximity to water or power lines, drainage systems, etc., may also affect excavation costs.

Suppose you have an area in your basement that needs excavation but is flooded frequently due to a drain being clogged. In that case, this could add significantly to the overall price because it may mean removing more dirt than expected due to water damage or other problems that would need to be fixed before the project could begin.

Estimated Cost of Excavation

For a room in the corner of your basement, expect to pay approximately $5-$15 per square foot depending on how complicated the shape is and what type of material you are excavating. If you need to move a drain or remove a tree stump, these factors may add additional costs.

What Should Be Included in a Basement Excavation?

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The cost of excavation should base on how much work has to be done, including the material removal, the depth of the excavation, and any other factors. Most basement excavations consist of digging out 6 inches to a foot around the entire perimeter (wall to wall) and removing all dirt floor down to the footing (the foundation that supports your home).

For excavation projects where a large amount of dirt is involved, this may include hauling the dirt away and disposing of it. Depending on how deep your excavation goes (and the depth of your basement), you may need to chip out some concrete or other type of masonry that makes up part of your basement floor or walls.

If you choose to hire a contractor, you should receive an estimate for the work before it begins. It is important to note that this will likely be only an estimated cost because many factors are involved in determining how much time and money it would take to complete your basement excavation project, including the type of soil, weather conditions, etc.

The cost of excavation can vary greatly. When you are shopping around for a contractor to complete this type of project, it is important that you get estimates from several different firms to choose the one that offers the best value for your money.

Also Read: 15 Basement Bar Ideas: Creativity On The Rocks

Can You Dig an Existing Basement Deeper?

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This question can be tricky because it depends on what you have in your basement and the condition of your home’s foundation. For example, suppose you need to move a drain or remove a tree stump. In that case, this could add significantly to the overall cost because it may mean removing more dirt than expected due to water damage or other problems that would need to be fixed before the project could begin.

An excavation that deepens your basement too much may not be cost-effective because it could weaken the foundation of your home, which is an added risk. If you consider increasing the depth of your basement, you should ask your contractor about his experience with similar projects to get a better idea of how much this would cost.

When excavating your basement, you need to ensure that the contractor you hire knows what he is doing. This is a very unforgiving job because it could potentially damage your home’s foundation or walls if not done correctly.

If you have an existing basement that needs excavation, be sure that the contractor has experience with this type of project. Depending on what is under the dirt, you may need to chip out some concrete or other type of masonry that makes up part of your basement floor or walls.

How Long Will It Take to Excavate a Basement?

Typically, basement excavations take between four and eight days, depending on the size of the excavation. The more complicated it is, the longer it may take to complete. It is important that your contractor takes his time when performing a basement excavation because rushing through a project could cause damage to your home’s foundation or walls.